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Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) – Part 36

PART 36 – CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS

(Excerpts affecting Procurement of Architect-Engineer Services)


36.000 Scope of part.
This part prescribes policies and procedures peculiar to contracting for construction and architect-engineer services. It includes requirements for using certain clauses and standard forms that apply also to contracts for dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements.

Subpart 36.1 – General
36.101 Applicability.
(a) Construction and architect-engineer contracts are subject to the requirements in other parts of this regulation, which shall be followed when applicable.

(b) When a requirement in this part is inconsistent with a requirement in another part of this regulation, this Part 36 shall take precedence if the acquisition of construction or architect-engineer services is involved.

(c) A contract for both construction and supplies or services shall include –

(1) Clauses applicable to the predominant part of the work (see Subpart 22.4), or
(2) If the contract is divided into parts, the clauses applicable to each portion.

36.102 Definitions.
"Architect-engineer services", as defined in 40 U.S.C. 541, means:
(1) Professional services of an architectural or engineering nature, as defined by State law, if applicable, which are required to be performed or approved by a person licensed, registered, or certified to provide such services;

(2) Professional services of an architectural or engineering nature performed by contract that are associated with research, planning, development, design, construction, alteration, or repair of real property; and

(3) Such other professional services of an architectural or engineering nature, or incidental services, which members of the architectural and engineering professions (and individuals in their employ) may logically or justifiably perform, including studies, investigations, surveying and mapping, tests, evaluations, consultations, comprehensive planning, program management, conceptual designs, plans and specifications, value engineering, construction phase services, soils engineering, drawing reviews, preparation of operating and maintenance manuals, and other related services.

"As-built drawings," see record drawings.

"Construction" means construction, alteration, or repair (including dredging, excavating, and painting) of buildings, structures, or other real property. For purposes of this definition, the terms "buildings, structures, or other real property" include but are not limited to improvements of all types, such as bridges, dams, plants, highways, parkways, streets, subways, tunnels, sewers, mains, power lines, cemeteries, pumping stations, railways, airport facilities, terminals, docks, piers, wharves, ways, lighthouses, buoys, jetties, breakwaters, levees, canals, and channels. Construction does not include the manufacture, production, furnishing, construction, alteration, repair, processing, or assembling of vessels, aircraft, or other kinds of personal property.

"Contract," as used in this part, is intended to refer to a contract for construction or a contract for architect-engineer services, unless another meaning is clearly intended.

"Design," as used in this part, means defining the construction requirement (including the functional relationships and technical systems to be used, such as architectural, environmental, structural, electrical, mechanical, and fire protection), producing the technical specifications and drawings, and preparing the construction cost estimate.

"Design-bid-build," as used in this part, means the traditional delivery method where design and construction are sequential and contracted for separately with two contracts and two contractors.

"Design-build," as used in this part, means combining design and construction in a single contract with one contractor.

"Firm," as used in this part in conjunction with architect-engineer services, means any individual, partnership, corporation, association, or other legal entity permitted by law to practice the professions of architecture or engineering.

"Plans and specifications," as used in this part, means drawings, specifications, and other data for and preliminary to the construction.

"Record drawings," as used in this part, means drawings submitted by a contractor or subcontractor at any tier to show the construction of a particular structure or work as actually completed under the contract.

"Shop drawings," as used in this part, means drawings submitted by the construction contractor or a subcontractor at any tier or required under a construction contract, showing in detail—

(1) The proposed fabrication and assembly of structural elements,
(2) The installation (i.e., form, fit, and attachment details) of materials or equipment, or
(3) Both.

"Two-phase design-build selection procedures," as used in this part, is a selection method in which a limited number of offerors (normally five or fewer) is selected during Phase One to submit detailed proposals for Phase Two (see Subpart 36.3).

36.103 Methods of contracting.
(a) Contracting officers shall acquire construction using sealed bid procedures if the conditions in 6.401(a) apply,except that sealed bidding need not be used for construction contracts to be performed outside the United States, its possessions, or Puerto Rico. (See 6.401(b)(2).)

(b) Contracting officers shall acquire architect-engineer services by negotiation, and select sources in accordance with applicable law, Subpart 36.6, and agency regulations.

36.104 Policy.
Unless the traditional acquisition approach of design-bid-build established under the Brooks Architect-Engineers Act (41 U.S.C. 541, et seq.) or another acquisition procedure authorized by law is used, the contracting officer shall use the two-phase selection procedures authorized by 10 U.S.C. 2305a or 41 U.S.C. 253m when entering into a contract for the design and construction of a public building, facility, or work, if the contracting officer makes a determination that the procedures are appropriate for use (see Subpart 36.3). Other acquisition procedures authorized by law include the procedures established in this part and other parts of this chapter and, for DoD, the design-build process described in 10 U.S.C. 2862.

Subpart 36.2 – Special Aspects of Contracting for Construction
(…)

36.209 Construction contracts with architect-engineer firms.
No contract for the construction of a project shall be awarded to the firm that designed the project or its subsidiaries or affiliates, except with the approval of the head of the agency or authorized representative.

Subpart 36.3 – Two-Phase Design-Build Selection Procedures

36.300 Scope of subpart.
This subpart prescribes policies and procedures for the use of the two-phase design-build selection procedures authorized by 10 U.S.C. 2305a and 41 U.S.C. 253m.

36.301 Use of two-phase design-build selection procedures.
(a) During formal or informal acquisition planning (see Part 7), if considering the use of two-phase design-build selection procedures, the contracting officer shall conduct the evaluation in paragraph (b) of this section.

(b) The two-phase design-build selection procedures shall be used when the contracting officer determines that this method is appropriate, based on the following:

(1) Three or more offers are anticipated.
(2) Design work must be performed by offerors before developing price or cost proposals, and offerors will incur a substantial amount of expense in preparing offers.
(3) The following criteria have been considered:

(i) The extent to which the project requirements have been adequately defined.
(ii) The time constraints for delivery of the project.
(iii) The capability and experience of potential contractors.
(iv) The suitability of the project for use of the two-phase selection method.
(v) The capability of the agency to manage the two-phase selection process.
(vi) Other criteria established by the head of the contracting activity.

36.302 Scope of work.
The agency shall develop, either in-house or by contract, a scope of work that defines the project and states the Government's requirements. The scope of work may include criteria and preliminary design, budget parameters, and schedule or delivery requirements. If the agency contracts for development of the scope of work, the procedures in Subpart 36.6 shall be used.

36.303 Procedures.
One solicitation may be issued covering both phases, or two solicitations may be issued in sequence. Proposals will be evaluated in Phase One to determine which offerors will submit proposals for Phase Two. One contract will be awarded using competitive negotiation.

36.303-1 Phase One.
(a) Phase One of the solicitation(s) shall include—

(1) The scope of work;
(2) The phase-one evaluation factors, including—

(i) Technical approach (but not detailed design or technical information);
(ii) Technical qualifications, such as—

(A) Specialized experience and technical competence;
(B) Capability to perform;
(C) Past performance of the offeror's team (including the architect-engineer and construction members); and


(iii) Other appropriate factors (excluding cost or price related factors, which are not permitted in Phase One);


(3) Phase-two evaluation factors (see 36.303-2); and
(4) A statement of the maximum number of offerors that will be selected to submit phase-two proposals. The maximum number specified shall not exceed five unless the contracting officer determines, for that particular solicitation, that a number greater than five is in the Government's interest and is consistent with the purposes and objectives of two-phase design-build contracting).

(b) After evaluating phase-one proposals, the contracting officer shall select the most highly qualified offerors (not to exceed the maximum number specified in the solicitation in accordance with 36.303-1(a)(4)) and request that only those offerors submit phase-two proposals.

36.303-2 Phase Two.
(a) Phase Two of the solicitation(s) shall be prepared in accordance with Part 15, and include phase-two evaluation factors, developed in accordance with 15.605. Examples of potential phase-two technical evaluation factors include design concepts, management approach, key personnel, and proposed technical solutions.

(b) Phase Two of the solicitation(s) shall require submission of technical and price proposals, which shall be evaluated separately, in accordance with Part 15.

Subpart 36.4--[Reserved]

Subpart 36.5--Contract Clauses
(…)

Subpart 36.6--Architect-Engineer Services

36.600 Scope of subpart.
This subpart prescribes policies and procedures applicable to the acquisition of architect-engineer services.

36.601 Policy.

36.601-1 Public announcement.
The Government shall publicly announce all requirements for architect-engineer services and negotiate contracts for these services based on the demonstrated competence and qualifications of prospective contractors to perform the services at fair and reasonable prices. (See Pub. L. 92-582, as amended; 40 U.S.C. 541-544.)

36.601-2 Competition.
Acquisition of architect-engineer services in accordance with the procedures in this subpart will constitute a competitive procedure. (See 6.102(d)(1).)

36.601-3 Applicable contracting procedures.
(a) Prior to announcing a requirement for architect-engineering services for the design of a facility, the contracting officer shall ask the technical official responsible for the facility being designed to specifically identify any areas where recovered materials cannot be used in the facility construction. In those areas where recovered materials may be used, the architect-engineer shall specify use of the maximum practicable amount of recovered materials in the construction design specifications consistent with 11.301(c).

(b) Sources for contracts for architect-engineer services shall be selected in accordance with the procedures in this subpart rather than the solicitation or source selection procedures prescribed in Parts 13, 14, and 15 of this regulation.

(c) When the contract statement of work includes both architect-engineer services and other services, the contracting officer shall follow the procedures in this subpart if the statement of work, substantially or to a dominant extent, specifies performance or approval by a registered or licensed architect or engineer. If the statement of work does not specify such performance or approval, the contracting officer shall follow the procedures in Parts 13, 14, or 15.

(d) Other than "incidental services" as specified in the definition of architect-engineer services in 36.102 and in 36.601-4(a)(3), services that do not require performance by a registered or licensed architect or engineer, notwithstanding the fact that architect-engineers also may perform those services, should be acquired pursuant to Parts 13, 14, and 15.

36.601-4 Implementation.
(a) Contracting officers should consider the following services to be "architect-engineer services" subject to the procedures of this subpart:

(1) Professional services of an architectural or engineering nature, as defined by applicable State law, which the State law requires to be performed or approved by a registered architect or engineer.
(2) Professional services of an architectural or engineering nature associated with design or construction of real property.
(3) Other professional services of an architectural or engineering nature or services incidental thereto (including studies, investigations, surveying and mapping, tests, evaluations, consultations, comprehensive planning, program management, conceptual designs, plans and specifications, value engineering, construction phase services, soils engineering, drawing reviews, preparation of operating and maintenance manuals and other related services) that logically or justifiably require performance by registered architects or engineers or their employees.
(4) Professional surveying and mapping services of an architectural or engineering nature. Surveying is considered to be an architectural and engineering service and shall be procured pursuant to section 36.601 from registered surveyors or architects and engineers. Mapping associated with the research, planning, development, design, construction, or alteration of real property is considered to be an architectural and engineering service and is to be procured pursuant to section 36.601. However, mapping services such as those typically performed by the Defense Mapping Agency that are not connected to traditionally understood or accepted architectural and engineering activities, are not incidental to such architectural and engineering activities or have not in themselves traditionally been considered architectural and engineering services shall be procured pursuant to provisions in Parts 13, 14, and 15.

(b) Contracting officers may award contracts for architect-engineer services to any firm permitted by law to practice the professions of architecture or engineering.

36.602 Selection of firms for architect-engineer contracts.

36.602-1 Selection criteria.
(a) Agencies shall evaluate each potential contractor in terms of its—

(1) Professional qualifications necessary for satisfactory performance of required services;
(2) Specialized experience and technical competence in the type of work required;
(3) Capacity to accomplish the work in the required time;
(4) Past performance on contracts with Government agencies and private industry in terms of cost control, quality of work, and compliance with performance schedules;
(5) Location in the general geographical area of the project and knowledge of the locality of the project; provided, that application of this criterion leaves an appropriate number of qualified firms, given the nature and size of the project; and
(6) Demonstrated success in prescribing the use of recovered materials and achieving waste reduction and energy efficiency in facility design.
(7) Acceptability under other appropriate evaluation criteria.

(b) When the use of design competition is approved by the agency head or a designee, agencies may evaluate firms on the basis of their conceptual design of the project. Design competition may be used when—

(1) Unique situations exist involving prestige projects, such as the design of memorials and structures of unusual national significance;
(2) Sufficient time is available for the production and evaluation of conceptual designs; and
(3) The design competition, with its costs, will substantially benefit the project.

(c) Hold discussions with at least three of the most highly qualified firms regarding concepts, the relative utility of alternative methods and feasible ways to prescribe the use of recovered materials and achieve waste reduction and energy-efficiency in facility design (see Part 23).

36.602-2 Evaluation boards.
(a) When acquiring architect-engineer services, an agency shall provide for one or more permanent or ad hoc architect-engineer evaluation boards (which may include pre-selection boards when authorized by agency regulations) to be composed of members who, collectively, have experience in architecture, engineering, construction, and Government and related acquisition matters. Members shall be appointed from among highly qualified professional employees of the agency or other agencies, and if authorized by agency procedure, private practitioners of architecture, engineering, or related professions. One Government member of each board shall be designated as the chairperson.

(b) No firm shall be eligible for award of an architect-engineer contract during the period in which any of its principals or associates are participating as members of the awarding agency's evaluation board.

36.602-3 Evaluation board functions.
Under the general direction of the head of the contracting activity, an evaluation board shall perform the following functions:

(a) Review the current data files on eligible firms and responses to a public notice concerning the particular project (see 36.604).

(b) Evaluate the firms in accordance with the criteria in 36.602-1.

(c) Hold discussions with at least three of the most highly qualified firms regarding concepts, the relative utility of alternative methods and feasible ways to prescribe the use of recovered materials and achieve waste reduction and energy-efficiency in facility design (see Part 23).

(d) Prepare a selection report for the agency head or other designated selection authority recommending, in order of preference, at least three firms that are considered to be the most highly qualified to perform the required services. The report shall include a description of the discussions and evaluation conducted by the board to allow the selection authority to review the considerations upon which the recommendations are based.

36.602-4 Selection authority.
(a) The final selection decision shall be made by the agency head or a designated selection authority.

(b) The selection authority shall review the recommendations of the evaluation board and shall, with the advice of appropriate technical and staff representatives, make the final selection. This final selection shall be a listing, in order of preference, of the firms considered most highly qualified to perform the work. If the firm listed as the most preferred is not the firm recommended as the most highly qualified by the evaluation board, the selection authority shall provide for the contract file a written explanation of the reason for the preference. All firms on the final selection list are considered "selected firms" with which the contracting officer may negotiate in accordance with 36.606.

(c) The selection authority shall not add firms to the selection report. If the firms recommended in the report are not deemed to be qualified or the report is considered inadequate for any reason, the selection authority shall record the reasons and return the report through channels to the evaluation board for appropriate revision.

(d) The board shall be promptly informed of the final selection.

36.602-5 Short selection process for contracts not to exceed the simplified acquisition threshold.
When authorized by the agency, either or both of the short processes described in this subsection may be used to select firms for contracts not expected to exceed the simplified acquisition threshold. Otherwise, the procedures prescribed in 36.602-3 and 36.602-4 shall be followed.

(a) Selection by the board. The board shall review and evaluate architect-engineer firms in accordance with 36.602-3, except that the selection report shall serve as the final selection list and shall be provided directly to the contracting officer. The report shall serve as an authorization for the contracting officer to commence negotiations in accordance with 36.606.

(b) Selection by the chairperson of the board. When the board decides that formal action by the board is not necessary in connection with a particular selection, the following procedures shall be followed:

(1) The chairperson of the board shall perform the functions required in 36.602-3.
(2) The agency head or designated selection authority shall review the report and approve it or return it to the chairperson for appropriate revision.
(3) Upon receipt of an approved report, the chairperson of the board shall furnish the contracting officer a copy of the report which will serve as an authorization for the contracting officer to commence negotiations in accordance with 36.606.

36.603 Collecting data on and appraising firms' qualifications.
(a) Establishing offices. Agencies shall maintain offices or permanent evaluation boards, or arrange to use the offices or boards of other agencies, to receive and maintain data on firms wishing to be considered for Government contracts. Each office or board shall be assigned a jurisdiction by its oarent agency, making it responsible for a geographical region or area, or a specialized type of construction.

(b) Qualifications data. To be considered for architect-engineer contracts, a firm must file with the appropriate office or board the Standard Form 254 (SF 254), "Architect-Engineer and Related Services Questionnaire," and when applicable, the Standard Form 255 (SF 255), "Architect-Engineer and Related Services Questionnaire for Specific Project."

(c) Data files and the classification of firms. Under the direction of the parent agency, offices or permanent evaluation boards shall maintain an architect-engineer qualifications data file. These offices or boards shall review the SF's 254 and 255 filed, and shall classify each firm with respect to –

(1) Location;
(2) Specialized experience;
(3) Professional capabilities; and
(4) Capacity, with respect to the scope of work that can be undertaken. A firm's ability and experience in computer-assisted design should be considered, when appropriate.

(d) Currency of files. Any office or board maintaining qualifications data files shall review and update each file at least once a year. This process should include:

(1) Encouraging firms to submit annually an updated statement of qualifications and performance data on a SF 254.
(2) Reviewing the SF's 254 and 255 and, if necessary, updating the firm's classification (see 36.603(c)).
(3) Recording any contract awards made to the firm in the past year.
(4) Assuring that the file contains a copy of each pertinent performance report (see 36.604).
(5) Discarding any material that has not been updated within the past three years, if it is no longer pertinent, see 36.604(c).
(6) Posting the date of the review in the file.

(e) Use of data files. Evaluation boards and other appropriate Government employees, including contracting officers, shall use data files on firms.

36.604 Performance evaluation.
(a) Preparation of performance reports. For each contract of more than $25,000, performance evaluation reports shall be prepared by the cognizant contracting activity, using the SF 1421, Performance Evaluation (Architect-Engineer). Performance evaluation reports may also be prepared for contracts of $25,000 or less.

(1) A report shall be prepared after final acceptance of the A&E contract work or after contract termination. Ordinarily, the evaluating official who prepares this report should be the person responsible for monitoring contract performance.
(2) A report may also be prepared after completion of the actual construction of the project.
(3) In addition to the reports in subparagraphs (a)(1) and (2) of this section, interim reports may be prepared at any time.
(4) If the evaluating official concludes that a contractor's overall performance was unsatisfactory, the contractor shall be advised in writing that a report of unsatisfactory performance is being prepared and the basis for the report. If the contractor submits any written comments, the evaluating official shall include them in the report, resolve any alleged factual discrepancies, and make appropriate changes in the report.
(5) The head of the contracting activity shall establish procedures which ensure that fully qualified personnel prepare and review performance reports.

(b) Review of performance reports. Each performance report shall be reviewed to ensure that it is accurate and fair. The reviewing official should have knowledge of the contractor's performance and should normally be at an organizational level above that of the evaluating official.

(c) Distribution and use of performance reports. Each performance report shall be distributed in accordance with agency procedures. The report shall be included in the contract file, and copies shall be sent to offices or boards for filing with the firm's qualifications data (see 36.603(d)(4)). The contracting activity shall retain the report for at least six years after the date of the report.

36.605 Government cost estimate for architect-engineer work.
(a) An independent Government estimate of the cost of architect-engineer services shall be prepared and furnished to the contracting officer before commencing negotiations for each proposed contract or contract modification expected to exceed $25,000. The estimate shall be prepared on the basis of a detailed analysis of the required work as though the Government were submitting a proposal.

(b) Access to information concerning the Government estimate shall be limited to Government personnel whose official duties require knowledge of the estimate. An exception to this rule may be made during contract negotiations to allow the contracting officer to identify a specialized task and disclose the associated cost breakdown figures in the Government estimate, but only to the extent deemed necessary to arrive at a fair and reasonable price. The overall amount of the Government's estimate shall not be disclosed except as permitted by agency regulations.

36.606 Negotiations.
(a) Unless otherwise specified by the selection authority, the final selection authorizes the contracting officer to begin negotiations. Negotiations shall be conducted in accordance with Part 15 of this chapter, beginning with the most preferred firm in the final selection (see 15.903(d)(1)(ii) on fee limitation and the determination and findings requirement at 16.306(c)(2) for a cost-plus-fixed-fee contract).

(b) The contracting officer should ordinarily request a proposal from the firm, ensuring that the solicitation does not inadvertently preclude the firm from proposing the use of modern design methods.

(c) The contracting officer shall inform the firm that no construction contract may be awarded to the firm that designed the project, except as provided in 36.209.

(d) During negotiations, the contracting officer should seek advance agreement (see 31.109) on any charges for computer-assisted design. When the firm's proposal does not cover appropriate modern and cost-effective design methods (e.g., computer-assisted design), the contracting officer should discuss this topic with the firm.

(e) Because selection of firms is based upon qualifications, the extent of any subcontracting is an important negotiation topic. The clause prescribed at 44.204(d), "Subcontractors and Outside Associates and Consultants" (see 52.244-4), limits a firm's subcontracting to firms agreed upon during negotiations.

(f) If a mutually satisfactory contract cannot be negotiated, the contracting officer shall obtain a written best and final offer from the firm, and notify the firm that negotiations have been terminated. The contracting officer shall then initiate negotiations with the next firm on the final selection list. This procedure shall be continued until a mutually satisfactory contract has been negotiated. If negotiations fail with all selected firms, the contracting officer shall refer the matter to the selection authority who, after consulting with the contracting officer as to why a contract cannot be negotiated, may direct the evaluation board to recommend additional firms in accordance with 36.602.

36.607 Release of information on firm selection.
(a) After final selection has taken place, the contracting officer may release information identifying only the architect-engineer firm with which a contract will be negotiated for certain work. The work should be described in any release only in general terms, unless information relating to the work is classified. If negotiations are terminated without awarding a contract to the highest rated firm, the contracting officer may release that information and state that negotiations will be undertaken with another (named) architect-engineer firm. When an award has been made, the contracting officer may release award information (see 5.401).

(b) Debriefings of successful and unsuccessful firms will be held after final selection has taken place and will be conducted, to the extent practicable, in accordance with 15.1004, 15.1006(b) through (f), and 15.1007(c). Note that 15.1006(d)(2) through (d)(5) do not apply to architect-engineer contracts.

36.608 Liability for Government costs resulting from design errors or deficiencies.
Architect-engineer contractors shall be responsible for the professional quality, technical accuracy, and coordination of all services required under their contracts. A firm may be liable for Government costs resulting from errors or deficiencies in designs furnished under its contract. Therefore, when a modification to a construction contract is required because of an error or deficiency in the services provided under an architect-engineer contract, the contracting officer (with the advice of technical personnel and legal counsel) shall consider the extent to which the architect-engineer contractor may be reasonably liable. The contracting officer shall enforce the liability and collect the amount due, if the recoverable cost will exceed the administrative cost involved or is otherwise in the Government's interest. The contracting officer shall include in the contract file a written statement of the reasons for the decision to recover or not to recover the costs from the firm.

36.609 Contract clauses.

36.609-1 Design within funding limitations.
(a) The Government may require the architect-engineer contractor to design the project so that construction costs will not exceed a contractually specified dollar limit (funding limitation). If the price of construction proposed in response to a Government solicitation exceeds the construction funding limitation in the architect-engineer contract, the firm shall be solely responsible for redesigning the project within the funding limitation. These additional services shall be performed at no increase in the price of this contract. However, if the cost of proposed construction is affected by events beyond the firm's reasonable control (e.g., if there is an increase in material costs which could not have been anticipated, or an undue delay by the Government in issuing a construction solicitation), the firm shall not be obligated to redesign at no cost to the Government. If a firm's design fails to meet the contractual limitation on construction cost and the Government determines that the firm should not redesign the project, a written statement of the reasons for that determination shall be placed in the contract file.

(b) The amount of the construction funding limitation (to be inserted in paragraph (c) of the clause at 52.236-22) is to be established during negotiations between the contractor and the Government. This estimated construction contract price shall take into account any statutory or other limitations and exclude any allowances for Government supervision and overhead and any amounts set aside by the Government for contingencies. In negotiating the amount, the contracting officer should make available to the contractor the information upon which the Government has based its initial construction estimate and any subsequently acquired information that may affect the construction costs.

(c) The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 52.236-22, Design Within Funding Limitations, in fixed-price architect-engineer contracts except when—

(1) The head of the contracting activity or a designee determines in writing that cost limitations are secondary to performance considerations and additional project funding can be expected, if necessary,
(2) The design is for a standard structure and is not intended for a specific location, or
(3) There is little or no design effort involved.

36.609-2 Redesign responsibility for design errors or deficiencies.
(a) Under architect-engineer contracts, contractors shall be required to make necessary corrections at no cost to the Government when the designs, drawings, specifications, or other items or services furnished contain any errors, deficiencies, or inadequacies. If, in a given situation, the Government does not require a firm to correct such errors, the contracting officer shall include a written statement of the reasons for that decision in the contract file.

(b) The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 52.236-23, Responsibility of the Architect-Engineer Contractor, in fixed-price architect-engineer contracts.

36.609-3 Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts.
The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 52.236-24, Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts, in fixed-price architect-engineer contracts.

36.609-4 Requirements for registration of designers.
The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 52.236-25, Requirements for Registration of Designers, in fixed-price architect-engineer contracts, except that it may be omitted from a contract when the design is to be performed –

(a) Outside the United States, its possessions, or Puerto Rico, or

(b) In a State or possession that does not have registration requirements for the particular field involved.

Subpart 36.7--Standard and Optional Forms for Contracting for Construction, Architect-Engineer Services, and Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements

36.700 Scope of subpart.
This subpart sets forth requirements for the use of standard and optional forms, prescribed in Part 53, for contracting for construction, architect-engineer services, or dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements. These standard and optional forms are illustrated in Part 53.

36.701 Standard and optional forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements.
(a) Contracting officers shall use Standard Form 1417, Pre-solicitation Notice (Construction Contract), to inform prospective offerors that a solicitation will be released for a proposed construction or dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements contract estimated to be $100,000 or more. This form may also be used if the proposed contract is estimated to be less than $100,000.

(b) Standard Form 1442, Solicitation, Offer, and Award (Construction, Alteration, or Repair), shall be used to solicit and submit offers, and award construction or dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements contracts expected to exceed the simplified acquisition thresholds, and may be used for contracts at or below the simplified acquisition threshold. In all sealed bid solicitations, or when the Government otherwise requires a noncancellable offer acceptance period, the contracting officer shall insert in the blank provided in Block 13D the number of calendar days that the offer must be available for acceptance after the date offers are due.

(c) Optional Form 347, Order for Supplies or Services, may be used for construction or dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements contracts that are at or below the simplified acquisition threshold; provided, that the contracting officer includes the clauses required (see Subpart 36.5) in the simplified acquisitions (see Part 13).

(d) Contracting officers may use Optional Form 1419, Abstract of Offers--Construction, and Optional Form 1419A, Abstract of Offers--Construction, Continuation Sheet, or the automated equivalent, to record offers submitted in response to a sealed bid solicitation (see 14.403) and may also use it to record offers submitted in response to negotiated solicitations.

(e) Contracting activities shall use Standard Form 1420, Performance Evaluation (Construction), in evaluating and reporting on the performance of construction contractors as required in 36.201.

36.702 Forms for use in contracting for architect-engineer services.
(a) Contracting officers shall use Standard Form 252, Architect-Engineer Contract, to award fixed-price contracts for architect-engineer services when the services are to be performed in the United States, its possessions, or Puerto Rico.

(b) The following standard forms shall be used preliminary to award of a contract for architect-engineer services relating to the construction, alteration, or repair of real property:

(1) Standard Form 254, Architect-Engineer and Related Services Questionnaire, shall be used to obtain information from architect-engineer firms regarding their professional qualifications.
Standard Form 255, Architect-Engineer and Related Services Questionnaire for Specific Project, shall be used to supplement the SF 254 with additional, specific information on the firms' qualifications for a particular project when the contract amount is expected to exceed the simplified acquisition threshold. This form may be used when the contract amount is expected to be at or below the simplified acquisition threshold, if the contracting officer determines that its use is appropriate.

(c) Standard Form 1421, Performance Evaluation (Architect-Engineer), shall be used in evaluating and reporting on the performance of architect-engineer contractors as required in 36.604.

AMERICAN COUNCIL OF ENGINEERING COMPANIES
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